Inept

who has too many thoughts

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Why is it that people are willing to spend $20 on a bowl of pasta with sauce that they might actually be able to replicate pretty faithfully at home, yet they balk at the notion of a white-table cloth Thai restaurant, or a tacos that cost more than $3 each? Even in a city as “cosmopolitan” as New York, restaurant openings like Tamarind Tribeca (Indian) and Lotus of Siam (Thai) always seem to elicit this knee-jerk reaction from some diners who have decided that certain countries produce food that belongs in the “cheap eats” category—and it’s not allowed out. (Side note: How often do magazine lists of “cheap eats” double as rundowns of outer-borough ethnic foods?)

Yelp, Chowhound, and other restaurant sites are littered with comments like, “$5 for dumplings?? I’ll go to Flushing, thanks!” or “When I was backpacking in India this dish cost like five cents, only an idiot would pay that much!” Yet you never see complaints about the prices at Western restaurants framed in these terms, because it’s ingrained in people’s heads that these foods are somehow “worth” more. If we’re talking foie gras or chateaubriand, fair enough. But be real: You know damn well that rigatoni sorrentino is no more expensive to produce than a plate of duck laab, so to decry a pricey version as a ripoff is disingenuous. This question of perceived value is becoming increasingly troublesome as more non-native (read: white) chefs take on “ethnic” cuisines, and suddenly it’s okay to charge $14 for shu mai because hey, the chef is ELEVATING the cuisine.

One of the entries from the list ‘20 Things Everyone Thinks About the Food World (But Nobody Will Say)’. (via crankyskirt)

I have been guilty of this. When so much good cheap thai is right there in Newtown, I feel no inclination to patronise the expensive places. After nearly a year in  Geneva, though… definitely willing to pay more for good Asian than Italian or generic european food.

(via kayloulee)

Filed under om nom nom

7,173 notes

pleasure-moments:

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Eliza Bennett

A Woman’s Work is Never Done

A series of photographic works titled ‘A Woman’s Work is Never Done’ Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand.  By using the technique of embroidery, which is traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of its opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy.  Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ‘ancillary’ jobs, such as cleaning, caring and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’. 

The technique, I recall first applying to my hand under a table during a home economics class in school. I was totally amazed to find that I could pass a needle under the top layers of skin without any pain, only a mild discomfort.  As with many childhood whims it passed and I hadn’t thought any more about it until quite recently when I decided to apply the process to my hand to make it appear calloused and work worn like that of a manual labourer. Some viewers consider the piece to be a feminist protest, for me it’s about human value. After all, there are many men employed in caring, catering, cleaning etc… all jobs traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’. Such work is invisible in the larger society, with ‘A woman’s work’ I aim to represent it.  (artist statement)

Website

Incredible!

(via latining)

409 notes

Can a thin person have body image struggles? Can a thin person be at war with their self-image? Can a thin person hate to look in the mirror?

Absolutely.

And does that suck?

Absolutely.

But the difference between these negative feelings and fatphobia is this: The only person worrying about whether or not I’m meeting beauty standards is me.

And that’s not the same for fat folk.

When you’re not thin, other people on the beach actually do take offense. When you’re not thin, people really do think that you shouldn’t be in a bathing suit. When you’re not thin, people really do make your body their moral obligation.

And while your internal struggle is real and significant, the point is: You might hate your body, but society doesn’t.

That’s thin privilege.

Let’s Talk About Thin Privilege — Everyday Feminism (via brutereason)

… I’ve  been thin. People did care about whether I was meeting beauty standards. Too thin? Eat a sandwich. Naturally slim? Report your exercise and diet regime! Look at her, standing there, eating cupcakes, don’t you just want to SLAP her?

Evidence suggests fat women have it worse, yes. But society hates the bodies of thin women, too. Even a slim-ish woman is a potential threat - she could get HORRIBLY FAT or THREATENINGLY THIN at any time.

(via brutereason)

134 notes

thecompleatdramaturg:

Twelfth Night dir. Darko Tresnjak

set design: Alexander Dodge

When I saw this in April of 2013, of course the acting was superb and the costumes were fantastic, but what really caught my eye was the set. During the show it could be configured in many ways, with Orsino’s bedroom coming up through the center, or with people running around in the passageways between the hedges. The bridges could be moved at will to simulate different environments, and the sky could change whenever the scene called for it. Overall, it lent the air of a garden party and to this day is one of the most visually enjoyable sets I’ve seen at the Hartford Stage. 

(via shredsandpatches)