Inept

who has too many thoughts

1,502 notes

Cap 2 Headcanon

hsavinien:

intosnarkness:

teaberryblue:

intosnarkness:

Peggy Carter married Gabe Jones but they didn’t have any kids.

They adopted British war orphans instead, and raised to be people that Captain America would be proud of.

I LOVE YOU FOR FIGURING OUT HOW TO MAKE THIS WORK I FOR REAL DID NOT THINK OF THIS.

THE ONLY ONE THEY NEVER QUITE UNDERSTAND IS SUSAN PEVENSIE

SO PEGGY TEACHES HER HOW TO WEAR LIPSTICK AND NYLONS

AND BREAK A MAN’S ARM

She’s oddly good at it for a person who has no record of previous training.  She’s very good with a bow and asks to learn to use a gun as soon as she can.  Peggy teaches her and they spend Saturday afternoons shredding the center of paper targets.

Susan becomes SHIELD’s range instructor shortly after she gets her driving license.  Agents only complain until they see her shoot.

Yes good

(via scottisqueer)

Filed under yes good

5 notes

Quiz: Judging a Book By Its Subject Headings

fairmatter:

Need a crash course in a classic? Look no further than the page before the first page- the subject headings, care of the Library of Congress, on the copyright page give it all away and can prove to be an excellent study guide. (Also can provide a good laugh on just the right sort of day. See: Jane Eyre.)

1.Boys. Shoe shiners. Poor children. New York (N.Y.). Street children.

2. Gentry. Ventriloquists. Pennsylvania.

3. Physicians’ spouses. Adultery. Middle class.

4. Russia—History. Russia—Officials and employees.

5. Sea stories, American. New York (N.Y.). Slave trade. Copyists. Sailors.

6. Swindlers and swindling. Swindlers and swindling in literature. Mississippi River. Steamboats.

7. Actresses. Mistresses. Young women.

8. Teenage boys. Criminals. Satire.

9. Orphans. Gardens. Friendship. Sick children. Yorkshire.

10. Triangles. Rejection. Yorkshire. Rural families. Foundlings.

11. Governesses. Mentally ill women. England.

12. Appearance. Conduct of life. Portraits.

13. Magicians. Germany. Devil.

14. Canada—Social life and customs. City and town life. Canada—In literature.

15. Irish—India. Orphans. Lamas. Boys.

16. Communal living. Collective farms. Farm life.

17. Wessex. People with visual disabilities. Mothers and sons. Mate selection. Heathlands. Adultery.

18. Lithuanian Americans. Chicago (Ill.) Working class. Stockyards. Immigrants.

19. Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc. Fathers and daughters. Castaways. Magicians. Islands

20. Fathers and daughter. Exiles.

21. Villages. France.

22. Infants switched at birth. Impostors and imposture. Passing (Identity). Trials (Murder). Conjoined twins. Race relations.

23. Physicians. London. Multiple personality.

24. Dentists—California.

(Answers below the jump!)

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I LIKE THIS GAME this is a good game

833 notes

erikkwakkel:

erikkwakkel:

Medieval egg book
As graffiti artists show every day, you can write on almost anything. In medieval times, however, most writing was done on stones, parchment (animal skin) or paper. The object in this image is special because it breaks with that rule (no pun intended): it shows Arabic funeral poetry written on an ostrich egg in the 15th century. It was found in a muslim graveyard in the Red Sea port of Quseir, Egypt. The text describes the journey from death to life and was written down to commemorate a young man that had died. Ostrich eggs were believed to give power to the dead and bring them back to life, which is why this book was ‘buried’ in the grave. What a great and unusual artifact of medieval written culture! It’s in pieces, but the shells survived in spite of being buried in the ground for over 500 years.
Pic: Dionisius Agius/University of Leeds. Read more about this remarkable object here and here. See this Tumblr post for a 15th-century globe made from an ostrich egg.

I don’t usually reblog my own posts, but this older one is just too appropriate for today: Happy Easter to all!

erikkwakkel:

erikkwakkel:

Medieval egg book

As graffiti artists show every day, you can write on almost anything. In medieval times, however, most writing was done on stones, parchment (animal skin) or paper. The object in this image is special because it breaks with that rule (no pun intended): it shows Arabic funeral poetry written on an ostrich egg in the 15th century. It was found in a muslim graveyard in the Red Sea port of Quseir, Egypt. The text describes the journey from death to life and was written down to commemorate a young man that had died. Ostrich eggs were believed to give power to the dead and bring them back to life, which is why this book was ‘buried’ in the grave. What a great and unusual artifact of medieval written culture! It’s in pieces, but the shells survived in spite of being buried in the ground for over 500 years.

Pic: Dionisius Agius/University of Leeds. Read more about this remarkable object here and here. See this Tumblr post for a 15th-century globe made from an ostrich egg.

I don’t usually reblog my own posts, but this older one is just too appropriate for today: Happy Easter to all!

(via latining)

6 notes

In conclusion: accepting the claim that online bullying can be traumatic may involve a shift in how we think about internet interaction. Generally, this shift entails taking more responsibility for the way we treat people online, taking online communication more seriously, and letting go of some stereotypes and misconceptions about the internet and mental illness. That sounds like hard work. I’m not surprised people find it so inconvenient.
Miri at Brute Reason

Filed under yes this

68 notes

brutereason:

Last week I was meeting with a new client who wanted to tell me about his cultural background (he’s a Bukharan Jew from Central Asia). He said that in his culture it would be unheard of for children to move away from their parents’ homes before they get married, and married sons tend to stay in the family home and just build a new wing onto the house. He contrasted this with middle-/upper-class American culture, in which children are expected to move away for college and then never come back.

I said that my own family falls somewhere in the middle, where staying together would’ve been preferable but my parents encouraged us to leave because they wanted us to have the opportunities that big cities have. So now my brother’s in Chicago and I’m in New York and nobody really thinks this is IDEAL, because the ideal would have been if my parents had found jobs in a city like Chicago or New York and we had all stayed together.

Anyway, this morning I saw one of those political cartoons about an American middle-class family demanding of their son why he’s still living at home with them (while college debt is a monster sitting next to him at the table), and it occurs to me how bizarre this view of adulthood really is. In other cultures, there’s nothing odd about being an adult, especially an unmarried adult, who lives with their parents. In fact, it’s often the preferred situation. 

I don’t know that I’d prefer to live in my parents’ home if it were in New York, but I’m also not sure I see the inherent good in living alone. It’s a waste of money, it’s lonely, and whatever useful “life skills” I’m picking up right now, I could’ve just as easily picked up by taking on more responsibility in my parents’ home, as I might’ve if I lived with them post-graduation. I don’t particularly care about having the freedom to bring partners home since I don’t date anyway. It’s obviously impossible since I’m never moving back to Ohio unless I’m literally forced to by being unemployed, but I wonder how long it’ll take American culture to catch up to economic reality and accept that adult children living with their parents is not some horrible failure but rather a common practice throughout the world.

In so doing, we (Anglophones? Anglophones plus other parts of Western Europe? I’m not sure where the boundaries lie on this particular cultural phenomenon) will need to build models of adulthood and independance that, y’know, work with being under parental roof. The overbearing (*insert migrant group here*) Mama / domineering (*insert same group here*) Papa are stock tropes of Angophone pop culture for a reason - anglophone cultural expectations of parent/child relationships in adulthood are often at odds with those of migrant communities.

(And this isn’t just a trope - I’m thinking of a really interesting study done a while back on not-straight people from Arabic-speaking communities in Australia - and the overwhelming number of respondants for whom respecting their parents, remaining part of their cultural group, etc, was far and away more important than being Out About Their Orientation. One section of the study report talked about the angst that is caused by the dominant you-must-come-out-and-be-yourself-to-be-a-fully-grown-queer narrative when projected onto those folks. Different priorities, yo.)

Filed under thinky thoughts